Tag Archives: Baby

6 Pregnancy Wellness Tips

1.  Eat a healthy diet and supplement as neededPreg 2A diet rich in nutrients is critical to the development of your baby, especially in the first trimester. Sometimes it is difficult to get all your nutritional needs from foods, especially if you are experiencing nausea.   A healthy diet with some supplements can help you maintain a healthy pregnancy and help the health of your baby in many ways.

2. Floss and maintain good oral hygiene – The benefits of good oral hygiene are amazing!  Flossing can help reduce gum disease, reduce systemic inflammation and can actually help reduce the risk of preterm labour.   It’s also a good idea to visit your dentist or oral hygienist to get a thorough cleaning.

Preg 13.  Avoid plastics – You have probably heard of BPA, a chemical found in plastics that can affect your hormone levels.  Other plastics also contain harmful chemicals that can affect your pregnancy, even “BPA-free” plastics.  Avoid eating and drinking from plastic containers while pregnant.  Also consider other hidden sources of harmful plastics: most store receipts, canned foods, most disposable coffee cups.

4. Consume adequate levels of vitamin D – Maintaining appropriate vitamin D levels can have a HUGE impact during pregnancy.   Having appropriate levels during pregnancy can reduce the risk of gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, even preterm labour and risk of needing a c-section.  Talk to your healthcare provider about how much vitamin D is the right amount to take.

5. Maintain a healthy vaginal ecology – The vaginal canal contains its own ecosystem and this plays an important role in pregnancy.  Maintaining a healthy amount of good bacteria can help reduce the risk of vaginal infections and also reduce the risk of preterm birth.  It can also help to prevent allergies in your baby.

6. Seek the advice of a Pelvic Health Physiotherapist – They can answer questions about preparing for labour and delivery, teach you postural awareness and the correct way to perform a pelvic floor contraction aka “kegels”. Prevention is key in reducing injury to your pelvic floor.

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Naturopathic Consultations During Pregnancy

Having a naturopathic doctor to coach you through a healthy pregnancy is a great way to improve your health and your baby’s health.

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What is a pelvic floor physiotherapist?

Pelvic health physiotherapists have additional post graduate training in assessment and treatment of pelvic dysfunctions such as urinary and fecal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and pelvic girdle pain syndromes such as vulvodynia, vestibulodynia, dyspareunia (pain during sex), SI joint dysfunction, and piriformis syndrome.  When I told my husband I was taking the internal pelvic health course his reaction was” you want to do what? Really?” So what is it that I do? I teach my patients how to properly use their pelvic floor to regain core strength and get back to their beloved activities (back to pain free living).

So how do I do that?

The same way I retrain an injured hamstring – manually testing the muscles’ strength, releasing any trigger points, facilitating a stronger more efficient contraction, re-patterning the correct strategies and giving you a home program to get yourself better. What does that all mean you ask? Well, it means I get my hands on it and in it!

ImageAnd how exactly do I do that?

The pelvic floor muscles are often described as a hammock in your pelvis from front to back, although I prefer Katy Bowman’s terminology of a trampoline. I asses vaginally and rectally which allows me to feel the muscles contract and relax against my finger, I can also feel for scar tissue from trauma (pregnancy, birth, surgery, fractured pelvis, tailbone or coccyx), and I can feel the movement of the coccyx.  I can tell which muscles are working well and which ones need help. I can see if there is any pelvic organ prolapse and the effects of movement and loading on the muscles and tissues. Treatment involves identifying the cause of the dysfunction and finding the solution that will work best for you.

Who should see a pelvic floor physiotherapist?

Do you suffer from things like diastasis recti (aka mummy tummy)? doming or tenting of your belly when you exercise? scars from an episiotomy, c-section or perineal tear? pressure or pain in your vagina or rectum? pelvic organ prolapse? pain during sex? pelvic girdle pain? leaking when you cough or sneeze or laugh or jump or run? feel like you can’t make it to the bathroom in time?  If you answered ‘yes’ to any of these then YOU should see a pelvic floor physiotherapist.  We also like to work on the prevention side of things pre-conception, during pregnancy and post natally.

And it’s not only about the women. Men have a pelvic floor too! Men who have urinary incontinence, pelvic girdle pain, or difficulty maintaining an erection can also benefit from seeing a pelvic health physiotherapist.

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How do you find a pelvic floor physiotherapist?

We are located in downtown Toronto. There are a handful of us in the GTA. We are all listed on the Women’s Health Division website (Find a physiotherapist – Women’s Health Division http://www.physiotherapy.ca/PublicUploads/229746WHD_%20Povince.pdf) and all physiotherapists that do internal work must be rostered with the college of Physiotherapists of Ontario http://publicregister.collegept.org/PublicServices/Start.aspx

Have you had your pelvic floor assessed? Tell us about your experience.

Physio After Pregnancy. When to Start?

New moms ask me this all the time, so I thought it would make a great blog post!

Q: How quickly after giving birth can I begin post-natal diastasis physio?

A:The sooner you begin the better.

My preference is to start during the pregnancy, as soon as the diastasis is noticed, presumed or diagnosed. This way we can start patterning your muscles to work together, in synergy. When you are more aware of how your core abdominals work it patterns your neurological system and that’s really half the battle. It also helps bring more blood flow to these muscles, and that translates to quicker healing times. Also if I get to see you before the baby does, I can show you exactly what you need to do immediately post delivery, I’m talking minutes, ok let’s be more realistic, hours, after delivery.

If you have already delivered your baby I can see you now. In my program, the first step is education. The beginning exercises to close the diastasis deal with the synergy between the diaphragm, pelvic floor, transverses abdominis and multifidis. They are 100% safe post natally as there is no resistance involved, just posture, breathing and patterning. We then build this into your everyday patterns of movement (ADLs). Once you are cleared by your midwife or physician, we start to add resistance and peak engagement exercises.

Splinting is often recommended, depending on the size of your diastasis and integrity of the connective tissue (that linea alba between the two recti). Most of the healing happens in your first 6 weeks, so doing the right thing from the start is the most effective way to resolve a DRA.

It is truly never too late to start either. It’s just more work the later you start, and the results can take longer to achieve.

Do you have a DRA? If so, when did you get diagnosed? Have you started treatment?